27-February-2018

Year 10 X-over Nepal

 

At the end of November I went on a trip to Nepal as a part of a program with
Rustic Pathways. A few teachers and around 15 year 10’s went on the trip
too. Leading up to the day we had to leave Perth, we had meetings every
week to prepare ourselves and get a broad knowledge of what was to come.
Nepal was a very different and memorable country. It was an experience to
remember and a once in a lifetime opportunity. There we embraced the
Nepalese culture and what it’s like to live in a poor country. We travelled to a
few different places in Nepal and we met the locals and got to know what they do day-to-day.
We stayed in a village and all of the students got split up into groups and stayed
with a family over the four days we stayed there.
The family we stayed with cooked us our breakfast, lunch
and dinner everyday, except for one of the days where we prepared and
cooked our own lunch and killed two chickens. The main meal in Nepal is
Dhal Bhat and it was served for every meal. Dhal Bhat consists of
steamed rice and cooked lentil soup that you pour over your rice and eat with
your hands. Overall, the Nepal trip was a great experience and something I will
remember for a lifetime. It was great to share that experience with my
friends and become friends with others on the trip aswell. Going to a country
like Nepal has changed how I see things and how I shouldn’t take certain things for
granted as a lot of people in Nepal don’t even have clean water.
Jacob

 

Visiting Nepal in November through December in 2017 was an experience
unlike any other for all who had the privilege to travel. Exploring the city of
Kathmandu, white water rafting, trekking along the Annapurna circuit,
watching the sunrise over the himalayas, and living with families less fortunate
than ours were only a few of the hands on activities and experiences we as a
group were blessed to encounter. Developing both friendships and as an
individual, the trip provided the chance for new understandings of the world
we live in to be instilled within each student and teacher.
During our trip we explored the Monkey temple, where the monkeys wandered around their home,
climbing and jumping from one structure to the next, a much more personal
experience as opposed to seeing them on the other side of a fence at the zoo.
As Nepalese families sat along the stairs heading to the top of the temple,
two young children played with a puppy found nearby.
Witnessing the immense joy experienced from playing with their
puppy was contagious, their giggles transfering to ours.
Ebony

 

Nepal was an amazing trip which you could talk about for hours and hours.
For me, the trip to Nepal can be broken down into three main aspects:
teamwork, adventure and a chance to try something new. Teamwork was
consistently shown throughout the trip whether it was white water rafting,
trekking, service projects or helping others bargain in the markets, but one of
the experiences I will remember the most is how the boys helped carry up the
bags, instead of making the porters carry up another bag when Mr. De Vries
dislocated his knee. Throughout the trip, we did many adventurous activities
such as the white water rafting. For many, this was a new experience which
put people out of their comfort zones. They had to use teamwork as we
paddled down the rivers. Many memories were created such as jumping off
the rafts and swimming in the freezing cold water. Lastly, in Nepal, we were
often faced with new things which were very challenging at times, for instance
having to use the squat toilet on the trek. To me, one of the new things I
experienced was a traditional Nepalese birthday where they shoved cake on
your face. It was fun and unexpected as I did not know that was going to
happen. Nepal was a trip of a lifetime which was different, adventurous, new
and helped us all bond together
Tiana

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